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Théâtre de Variétés

Jean-Antoine Alavoine, Jacques Cellerier

history of the theatresupplementtechnical dataHistoric equipment

Important events

(detail)4.6.1807 | opening
Opened with Le Panorama de Momus.

People

Jean-Antoine Alavoine |main architect
Jacques Cellerier |main architect

History

Théâtre de Variétés..  “was built by a company of associated actors, and mademoiselle Montansier  was the proprietor of a fifth part. Its front, towards the boulevard Montmarine, though very small is in the purest style. M. Cellerier, under whose direction it was built, decorated it with two ranges of columns, Doric and Ionic, surmounted by a pediment. The ground floor presents a vestibule, from which two flights of stairs lead to the first tier of boxes and the saloon, which is over the vestibule. This saloon, elegantly decorated with columns and busts, opens by three large windows upon the outer portico. The house, which is nearly circular, is forty-two feet in length by thirty-six in breadth, measured from the fronts of the first tier of boxes. Two other tiers of boxes, decorated with a range of pillars of the composite order, a third tier above the cornice, and a spacious gallery, occupy the height of the edifice. Green and gold prevail in the decoration. The front of the first tier of boxes is ornamented with cameos representing the most celebrated scenes in which Brunet and Tiercelin appear.
This theatre will contain nearly thirteen hundred spectators. Its distribution and scenery are extremely good. The outlets are numerous. There is also at the back of the theatre a wide door, which can be lowered at pleasure, like a drawbridge, for the purpose of enlarging the stage, when an extraordinary space is required, admitting air during the performance, obtaining light in the day, or clearing the house speedily in case of fire.
Behind the theatre is a garden, an elegant cafe, and a billiard-room."

 

In:  Whittaker, G. B.: The History of Paris from the Earliest Period to the Present Day: Vol. II. London, 1825 p. 507 - 509

 

 

 

Author: G. B Whittaker

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